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Air pump bleed off

Discussion in 'Goldfish Gear' started by chocky, Feb 3, 2016.

  1. chocky

    chocky Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2014
    Location:
    WA, Australia
    I recently picked up a second hand large air pump to replace my old one.
    it's pumping a lot more air then I currently need but would like to find out how do I know I'm bleeding off enough air so that I don't damage the pump?

    is just a resun lp50 (?)
     
  2. Lou

    Lou Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2015
    Location:
    Western Michigan
    In the past when I used lower quality air stones and (aquarium) pumps designed for the purpose, I always used an extra valve to bleed some air off. I actually did not see any increase in life of these small (double or quad outlet) aquarium air pumps. The diaphragms always started tearing starting from the screw hole. The only small air pump that does not do this is the WISA (made in Germany) because it uses a completely different design (more like a pond pump type of linear movement).

    Once I started using pond air pumps and higher quality airstones, plastic airstones, or simply small drilled holes in pipes, I never found there is a need to bleed off air for the life of the rubber diaphragm, which are much better nowadays compared to 10-20 years ago, especially by these Chinese makers like Resun or Hailea. These pond pumps can pump to much deeper depth so a little back pressure from aquariums and shallow tubs won't hurt them at all. Plus these diaphragm kits are very inexpensive (I have bought some kits for the LP60 or AP60 for less than $7).

    I found the life of the diaphragms is more affected by extreme temperatures (extreme hot or cold in a pond environment) rather by some back pressure within the design specs of the air pump.

    Your pump is probably their LP60 (sold as AP60 here in the USA by Pondmaster or Danner). It is nominally 70 LPM @ 0 psi and consume 50 W. I have a couple of these for pond use (pumps to 6' , about 1.8 meters, deep, driving rubber diffusers without bleeding). The one below is the LP 40 (50 LPM and 35 W). (These type of air pump always uses less electricity than rated when they are connected to air devices.)

    If you have way too much air, then you use one or two extra valve to bleed off the excess. Just open them up a bit and then adjust all other used ones for your filters, etc. to your liking. Do a couple iterations and and you should have adjusted whatever air you need and any excess is bled off. A coil of air hose on the bleeding valve will decrease the hissing sound somewhat.

    I am using some high flow sponge filters and (2 liter container) k1 moving bed filters and try to allocate a lot of air (3-5 lpm) for each outlet in my large aquariums and tubs. So a pump like yours would drive 12-20 outlets.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2016
  3. chocky

    chocky Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2014
    Location:
    WA, Australia
    just checked it's the lp40
    but the wattage on the pump is rated at 40W buy online says 35w. could be older version as I did pick it up for like $20 :)
     
  4. Lou

    Lou Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2015
    Location:
    Western Michigan
    Could be. These things are getting more and more efficient. Several 60 LPM models use only 35 W now.

    I do not know about your setup but the LP40 should not be too powerful (anything larger than the LP40 use aluminum casing and are really quiet). I have two 30 LPM models running in my basement now. One for two 110 gallon tubes, and another for a 120-gal, and two 55-gal tanks. Eight outlets from each pump and the sponge filters flow a lot of water and the K1 tumbles really well. In the two 110-gal tubs, air is the only method of filtration. There are a total of 32 adult goldfish in these tubs/tanks.
     
  5. chocky

    chocky Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2014
    Location:
    WA, Australia
    OK THANKS :)
    i have one these connected:
    upload_2016-2-4_12-21-7.png

    is it normal for it to get a bit warm?
     
    CaliGold likes this.
  6. Lou

    Lou Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2015
    Location:
    Western Michigan
    That thing has more than enough outlets for your LP40 pump.

    Yes, it will feel a bit warm because the air output from the pump is warming it up a bit. It is one of the mechanisms for the pump to cool, in addition to the little cooling from the casing. (That was why the larger ones use metal casing.)
     
    chocky likes this.
  7. chocky

    chocky Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2014
    Location:
    WA, Australia
    cool alright then thanks for all your help :)
     

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