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Algae blooms in pond...

Discussion in 'Goldfish in the Pond' started by CaliGold, Jan 20, 2016.

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  1. CaliGold

    CaliGold Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2015
    Location:
    South Carolina
    Hey guys,

    So my parents just moved into a new house in California, and the house came with a little pond that they are now trying to learn about taking care of. I honestly don't know how many gallons it is because I have yet to visit them (and probably won't get the chance for another month or two) but I will try to ask my mom if she could take a few pictures for me to share. There are apparently 3 little goldfish in the pond (although apparently they're pretty shy). So I've already been named the official Pond Supervisor, despite living across the country, because I have 2 fancy goldfish. I've already given them lots of advice on filtration (the pond already came with a filter) and water changes, but until I actually see the pond, I'm not going to be able to give a full report.

    The main issue for them right now, though, is that they seem to be having an algae bloom of some kind. I suggested adding a partial shade screen, because I know algae like a lot of light, but what else could I suggest to them? I don't want to add any more bioload to the pond until I see it, but I've heard chemical algae-fighters are generally useless. The previous home-owners left them a bottle of "TotalPond Sludge Remover", but I'm not sure how effective that would be (it looks to be a beneficial bacteria additive of some sort, so I don't think it would help against algae).

    If any of you pond-afficianados could help me find a solution for this inherited pond problem, I'd really appreciate the help!
     
  2. Faebinder

    Faebinder Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2015
    Location:
    Hershey, PA
    The lack of a filter is a big reason behind an algae bloom.

    Adding more plants (though its winter now and they wont use up the nitrates) will reduce the algae. Lily pads, iris, hyacinths, water lettuce, or any bog plant for that zone. The more, the less nitrates for algae, the happier the fish.
     
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  3. CaliGold

    CaliGold Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2015
    Location:
    South Carolina
    Thank you @Faebinder, I don't know what kind of filter the pond is running on right now, but it definitely has one. I'll be doing more thorough investigation when I visit them. I'll also let them know about the plants. :)
     
  4. Lou

    Lou Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2015
    Location:
    Western Michigan
    What type of algae, green water or string algae? Both require light and nutrients but they should be handled differently.

    I actually like some algae in ponds. They are super-efficient to convert ammonia to nitrite and nitrates. Plus, they consume the nitrates. They are also arguably the best food for goldfish. They just do not look good to some people.

    Many breeders in China raise goldfish in mud ponds with green water (intentional). The fish have the best color.

    My 20,000 gallon koi pond really does not have a bio-filer ( it would be too big, properly sized). So the water is a bit green. I make sure to use a lot of aeration (total over 200 liters per minute), especially during the night. The fish (many many large koi) are very healthy and they reproduce every year. Last November I finally had to thin it down by giving away over 100 koi.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2016
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  5. Faebinder

    Faebinder Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2015
    Location:
    Hershey, PA
    Agree with Lou, algae helps keeps nitrates down and oxygen up, so it's not a bad thing. Also agree that light makes a big difference with algae, as you already told your parents about shading the pond.
     
  6. Faebinder

    Faebinder Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2015
    Location:
    Hershey, PA
    When in doubt... get a Hi Fin Banded Shark ... they will quaff up the algae like syrup and probably poop it all out. heheh.
     
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  7. CaliGold

    CaliGold Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2015
    Location:
    South Carolina
    Thanks guys, I'll be passing all of that along :)

    And since I haven't seen it, I'm sure it's not a ton of algae (my parents are of the "everything must be sparkling clean" variety), and I'm not sure what kind it is. I know, I'm giving pretty vague and useless info, but my mom and dad have never had had a pond or anything before. But I did tell them the goldfish are probably enjoying the snack. So for the moment they're fine, and since my parents are still in the process of moving stuff around and organizing the place, the pond is pretty safe from being scrutinized too closely. The previous home-owners had it for a few years, apperantly, so it's pretty well established.

    I'll definitely look into those cute little banded sharks when I've had a chance to properly inspect, though :)
     
  8. wakinsan

    wakinsan Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2015
    Location:
    oxford
    Definitely more plants. You may need to clean out the filter since it's inherited. Maybe put in new foams.
    Watch the series on this link, it might help and give you ideas
    Anti algae products might help initially but its the achievement of balance in the pond that will control these blooms. Something i messed up the following year, sadly.
     
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  9. shakaho

    shakaho Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Location:
    Orlando FL
    Algae growing on pond surfaces helps prevent green water, improves water quality, and provides healthful nibbling for the goldfish.

    The only way I can get green water in my ponds is to turn off the filter. My ponds get subtropical sun, so while algae require some light to grow, I don't believe more light means more algae.

    See if you can get them to give you the dimensions of the pond. Also request a picture of the filter. Also asK them how and how often they clean the filter.
    They have to be overfeeding, have deficient filtration, or have a very tiny pond to have an algae "problem" with only three little fish.

    Of course you need to determine whether they have green water problem or don't like algae growing on the sides of the pond.

    As Lou said above, aeration can help.
     
  10. Faebinder

    Faebinder Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2015
    Location:
    Hershey, PA
    What I wanna know is how is holding those hyacinths in one spot.. I cant see what he's using.
     
  11. wakinsan

    wakinsan Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2015
    Location:
    oxford
    those hyacinths are held in place by a loop of garden wire anchored by the edge of the pond with the loop just under the surface of the water. its better than nets or ropes as you can shape the garden wire as you need. you can see it on the subsequent videos.
     
  12. wakinsan

    wakinsan Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2015
    Location:
    oxford
    i agree green water i believe is good for frys. i had goldfish frys last year, which i separated into 2 groups. one in an aquarium inside and the rest left out in the green soup pond. incredibly those in the pond grew faster and bigger than those inside fed regularly and in clear water.
     

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