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clear pond sludge remover

Discussion in 'Goldfish in the Pond' started by mitzi56, Dec 30, 2015.

  1. mitzi56

    mitzi56 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2015
    Location:
    Dunnellon fl
    My pond is over a year active now and I've never done a vacuum along the river rock on the bottom and was wondering of course after i do my vacuum if anyone has ever tried the clear pond sludge rover. Its suppose to be all natural and use oxygen to remove the murkiness of the water right away. if so please respond
     
  2. Faebinder

    Faebinder Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2015
    Location:
    Hershey, PA
    There always be some sludge down there unless you remove all water and manually remove that last sticky part. That stuff sticks like crazy. You're gonna have to manually go down there and do it with your hands. I tried to do it myself but I got dojo loaches and was afraid I would step on the ones hanging out in the last bits of water in the pond. Plus I tried to pull them off, seems like a lot of work. The vacuum couldnt take those last bits off. On the other hand, all the none sticky stuff really comes off nice with those vacuums.

    The chemical removers IMO have been useless. The bacterial sludge removers are fine but you're gonna have to apply them weekly and they wont work in low temperatures.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2015
  3. mitzi56

    mitzi56 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2015
    Location:
    Dunnellon fl
    well haven't seen any loaches yet lol but have tons of snails which should be helping to keep the debris a little better. I have mostly river rock at the bottom and i tried vacuuming with just a suction type thingy like you use in an aquarium and it was unbelievable how much sludge was in there and coming up through the tube. I of course had to leave the syphon in one place for about 10-15 minutes on each spot until in ran clear then i would move it to another spot, so its going to take me forever this way and ordered a pond vac in hopes it may go a little faster. I agree theres no getting everything out, but i believe that its ok to have a bit in there to feed the plants, and the snails or other bottom sludge feeders may help keep the water in balance so as not to hurt the fish . Im sure lake bottoms are a lot worse than our ponds at times, yet fish grow and multiply there just fine
     
  4. beerbladder

    beerbladder Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2012
    Location:
    Nampa, ID
    In a lake there is about one fish per 100,000 gallons of water, so not a fair comparison. Your problem is common with aquascaped ponds with rock bottoms. In the koi community it is known as a toilet that never gets flushed. I know because I have been there and done that. Rebuilt my old pond with a ledge that held rocks and plants only around the perimeter. The main body of the pond had a bottom drain added that fed into the skimmer, and no rocks in this area allowed for solid waste to be removed with filter cleaning.
     
  5. mitzi56

    mitzi56 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2015
    Location:
    Dunnellon fl
    wow sounds complex! but efficient. Well i dont then I'm going to go to that extent, i think ill just try flushing my toilette as best i can with a vacuum for now. Not even sure if this particular breed of fish will do well in this natural pond setting. I do however flush it out also with clean water on occasion and keep my filter cleaned which does seem to hold a great deal of debris as well. If these orandas do not fair well than i mat just stick with a few fantails maybe. maybe won't have to clean the pond as often that way. Right now i have one adult and about 12 juvenile panda oranges so we will see how they fair as they become adults. I suspect their will be less that that by the time they become full grown adults. but I'm going to do my best to keep the water quality good.
     
  6. beerbladder

    beerbladder Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2012
    Location:
    Nampa, ID
    You can minimize the debris problem by moving the rocks from the middle to the sides, and keeping the fish population to a minimum. The aquascape ponds are beautiful and natural looking, but are very hard to maintain as you are finding out. Problems usually start showing up in the third or fourth year. When I drained my old pond, to remove the rocks, the smell of rotting sludge was a real eye opener.
     
  7. shakaho

    shakaho Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Location:
    Orlando FL
    If you can find a natural lake/pond that has rocks in the bottom, please report it. You have found something unique. Natural lakes and ponds have mud bottoms, nice clean healthy ones unless the lake/pond is badly polluted. At the depths of our ponds, the water of a natural pond has enough oxygen at the bottom that organic waste decomposes aerobically without releasing toxins, unlike what happens in the anaerobic pockets in layers of rocks. The only natural bodies of water that have rocks in the bottom are some fast-flowing streams.

    Be careful with the pond vac. Goldfish get excited when you start stirring up the bottom since this releases edibles. They want to hang out around the vacuum, and can get vacuumed up.
     
  8. mitzi56

    mitzi56 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2015
    Location:
    Dunnellon fl
    ya i noticed that a bit today, but generally they swam away when i got too close
     
  9. Faebinder

    Faebinder Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2015
    Location:
    Hershey, PA
    I think people like rocks at the bottom of their ponds cause it stops the liner from moving a lot.
     
  10. mitzi56

    mitzi56 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2015
    Location:
    Dunnellon fl
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2016

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