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    Friendly note from GFK. Please review this beginner guide for your fish.

Fancy Goldfish and Illness

Discussion in 'All Questions from Newbies' started by Parallaxus, Jan 3, 2018.

  1. Parallaxus

    Parallaxus New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2018
    Location:
    Toronto
    I've been keeping Cichlids and other freshwater fish for several years now, and am now considering a switch to Fancy Goldfish.

    I've been doing my research, and have found a lot of reports of Goldfish Dropsy and Swim Bladder issues, and so I'm starting to rethink Goldfish entirely.

    Are they really that hard to keep healthy?
    Though I'm an experienced fish keeper, I'm not really seeking a challenge. If I wanted that, I'd go with Discuss lol

    I'd love to hear thoughts from the community.

    Thanks
     
  2. Cheyenne B.

    Cheyenne B. Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2017
    Location:
    Kentucky
    Dropsy is a symptom of an underlying illness, such as a bacterial or fungal infection. Swim Bladder is often genetic. Fancy goldfish are not "hard" to keep. These things are simply more common illnesses that are associated with them. Same thing with a breed of dog that has more occurrences of liver cancer than another. Since you've kept fish, I'm sure you know about water changes. Goldfish need weekly 60-100% water changes and excellent filtration.
     
  3. shakaho

    shakaho Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Location:
    Orlando FL
    As with other domestic animals, goldfish with a variety of mutations have more health problems and a shorter life span than the "wild type" specimens. If you are happy with just a short body and twin tails, you will find that fantails are nearly a vigorous as commons. Add more mutations and you increase the probability of ailments. Dropsy isn't much more frequent in fancy goldfish than in common goldfish. However, swim bladder disorders are sometimes just called the "fancy goldfish disease."

    The only thing that makes the more normal goldfish difficult to keep is simply that they are big fish and as such need lots of water volume (like 20 gallons per fish) and produce lots of waste so you need good filtration and plenty of water changes. They tolerate a wide temperature and pH range, aren't fussy about water hardness, and can live 10 years or more.
     
  4. JEM Fish

    JEM Fish Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2017
    Location:
    New York
    In my experience, as long as you have proper water quality and feed a good food (I like repashy super gold), you shouldn't have many, or any really, problems. A MAJOR thing though is to get your fish from a good source. The reason you hear about so many problems is that people who buy a goldfish for a few bucks at a pet store have issues because stores like PetSmart and Petco don't really care about there goldfish. If you are on a really tight budget, country Maxx isn't too bad aslong as it appears healthy and you QT, I've had success with them. I recommend online stores or local breeders, and some local pet stores can be alright. I even ordered a cheaper fish off eBay and it was extremely healthy, although not the highest quality. It survived an ich out break and is still very healthy. This sight is a good place to get fish though, but they can be few and far between. Basically, asking as you provide basic proper care and but from a good source, goldfish are very easy to keep.

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  5. Cheyenne B.

    Cheyenne B. Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2017
    Location:
    Kentucky
    I have to disagree with your pet store statements. More than half of my stock came from PetSmart. It's all about how you groom them. One of their fish is my largest fish and he is completely healthy, other than being a butt head every now and then. :) I also have an oranda that was dying. She'd been put in a bad tank with fin nippers, fish who were pushing her into the filter intake, and essentially, had little fins at all. I nursed her back to health and now, she's a big, gorgeous female who loves spawning.

    The pet store has them for a short time, you have them forever. It really depends on your experience. I have also found that pet store fish have a way better immune system than my others.
     
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  6. orangecrush

    orangecrush Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2016
    Location:
    Loma Linda, CA 92354
    If you buy healthy fish and give them proper care, they will be just as healthy and long lived as any other type of fish.

    Good luck and happy fishkeeping, Jim.
     
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  7. JEM Fish

    JEM Fish Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2017
    Location:
    New York
    I was just saying that at larger pet stores like that, they are more often sick and often times beginners buy from there so they can't get the fish healthy and they die. I'm by no means saying that if you are very experienced you can't have a healthy, gorgeous fish it's just that, at least in my experience, fish are typically less healthy. I have had any luck with pet smart or Petco even with proper care and sone medication, but I'm sure you can get healthy fish! But for a beginner it's safer to buy from somewhere with consistently, if not always, healthy fish. The price is worth it.

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  8. JEM Fish

    JEM Fish Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2017
    Location:
    New York
    I was just saying that at larger pet stores like that, they are more often sick and often times beginners buy from there so they can't get the fish healthy and they die. I'm by no means saying that if you are very experienced you can't have a healthy, gorgeous fish it's just that, at least in my experience, fish are typically less healthy. I have had any luck with pet smart or Petco even with proper care and sone medication, but I'm sure you can get healthy fish! But for a beginner it's safer to buy from somewhere with consistently, if not always, healthy fish. The price is worth it.

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  9. Cheyenne B.

    Cheyenne B. Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2017
    Location:
    Kentucky
    Beginners also make mistakes and often lose fish, we all do. That's how we learn. Pet store fish won't take such a hit to the bank account. At least for their first few fish until they get the hang of it.
     
  10. JEM Fish

    JEM Fish Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2017
    Location:
    New York
    That is a good point, but if you read up on goldfish care and prepare extensively, I'm sure you could keep a thriving fish without the dilemma of buying a fish that is sick to begin with. Even just a cheaper fish online for about 10$ then shipping was so healthy and all the reviews were wonderful as well, and for a relatively low price, I'd say that it's worth it.

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  11. Sbuggg13

    Sbuggg13 Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2017
    Location:
    NY
    I agree with you and the reason is that big box pet stores are noted-and have been in the spotlight before to mistreat their animals, even before they get to the store they are left in awful conditions by the supplier and you never really know what your getting. There are so many articles and videos that you can find about the mistreatment of those animals, it's so sad. Although I can agree somewhat that you should get a cheap fish if you're a beginner, the loss won't be so detrimental on your bank account. However, I would start by going to your local pet shop because chances are they know where your fish came from. They do import, yes, but my LFS has local breeders that they get their fish from so for the sake of not supporting animal abuse and compromising health, and also supporting local businesses, I think it's a win all around. A lot of small businesses have good quality fish for not a hefty price especially when you buy them as juveniles. Online can be a good source too because people leave reviews on how the breeder is and how the quality of the fish are. I would go those routes before I went to a big box pet store. But if you don't have the extra money for shipping costs, or don't have a LFS near you, then using big box stores would be a last resort kind of move :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2018
  12. Buttercup

    Buttercup Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2016
    Location:
    Western NC
    I made the same switch less than a year ago from tropical to goldies and I couldn’t be happier. I went through the newbie learning curve and the best advice I can give has already been stated. Regardless of where you get your fish babies, unless they have already contracted a serious illness... with a good diet, excellent filtration, and care there’s a good chance they will be happy and healthy. There will be times when you will deal with sickness and loss, but hopefully those will be valuable learning lessons for you (treating illness can be mind boggling). I have bought expensive, online fish from well known breeders, from big box pet stores, from local stores and from wally-world. I have had equal success and loss from each. My advice would be to shop for the fish that appeals to you, quarantine for at LEAST a month, and take good care of them!


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