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Green water filtration

Discussion in 'Advance Water Quality' started by Vodka, Oct 9, 2014.

  1. Vodka

    Vodka Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2014
    Location:
    Brunei
    What kind of filtration do you use for green water? What do you guys suggest for green water? I have extra seven gallon tub.. Should I culture there or something?

    Do you guys use sponge filters or what?
     
  2. small_ranchu

    small_ranchu Admin Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2008
    Location:
    Bergen, New Jersey
    what is your plan? Are you planning to raise fish in green water? If it is the case then you don't need any filter. You just need a strong air pump and water change.

    Green water will absorb all ammonia as their food.
     
    umi ranchu likes this.
  3. Vodka

    Vodka Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2014
    Location:
    Brunei
    Oh okay, I see. Thanks.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  4. WaterbearGoldfish

    WaterbearGoldfish Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2015
    Location:
    washington, US
    what are the advantages of green water?
     
    alorindanya12 likes this.
  5. WaterbearGoldfish

    WaterbearGoldfish Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2015
    Location:
    washington, US
    and disadvantages
     
    alorindanya12 likes this.
  6. Virginia ranchu

    Virginia ranchu Professional Breeder

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2008
    Location:
    Arlington, Virginia
    Unfiltered outdoor ponds with no plants will develop green water if there is enough sunlight. I have noticed that the algae seems to help develop more intense colors (especially reds), but so does bright sunlight. The disadvantages are that you cannot see your fish well, and green water consumes oxygen at night, so without good aeration, the oxygen levels can plummet. Also the green water holds more heat, so on very hot days the water temp can rise a lot. This is especially true with above ground ponds (black plastic tubs). To be honest, green water just happens, so change about 75% of the water once a week and try to keep a light green color, but never soupy, dark green. You might also consider a matt of floating water lettuce or hyacinth for the same de-nitrifying effects but without the same need for frequent water changes.
     
    umi ranchu likes this.
  7. WaterbearGoldfish

    WaterbearGoldfish Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2015
    Location:
    washington, US
    i want it for breeding purposes, i see people raising there goldfish in it, and they seem to do really well
     
  8. Virginia ranchu

    Virginia ranchu Professional Breeder

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2008
    Location:
    Arlington, Virginia
    You probably won't be able to raise fry successfully in green water. In the beginning, they need shallow water, and it is critical to be able to see the fry to judge how they are growing and how much brine shrimp is present, and so you don't suck them up with the siphon. The parents may spawn okay in green water, but you'll need to take the eggs to raise separately
     
    chocky likes this.
  9. WaterbearGoldfish

    WaterbearGoldfish Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2015
    Location:
    washington, US
    oh then how do people in japan and china raise goldfish in green water?
     
  10. Virginia ranchu

    Virginia ranchu Professional Breeder

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2008
    Location:
    Arlington, Virginia
    They have duck farms with waste retention lagoons for growing tons of live daphnia... not easy to replicate in the back yard
     
    Amy S likes this.
  11. Ununique

    Ununique Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2015
    Location:
    Lancaster, Pa
    Not sure how japan and china raise fry, and all I know of larger fish is just from images.

    My own experience is its fine, the fish eat it. Wether this is passively or actively I can't say as I still feed pellets and FBW when they are in green water. But I do see lots of real dark green poo.
    I would think fry may be fine if you can deal with culling which may involve moving them to clear water to see them properly.

    While I don't know the science behind it; apparently fish release other chemicals that can reduce their growth, this is what you want to continue doing water changes to remove. My growout fish thrive in any range of green water. That is at reasonable stocking levels and temps.
     
  12. Aquayne

    Aquayne Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2016
    Location:
    Morganton, NC
    Florida fish farms actually spread sheep manure and cotton seed meal on the bottom of new ponds to foster the green algae. The fry of the fish eat the algae and grow very fast. The only organism that likes clear water is us. The fish are happy in peas soup we need the clarity for culling purposes.
     
    Lukass and Lou like this.
  13. Lou

    Lou Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2015
    Location:
    Western Michigan
    Absolutely.

    Another "benefit" of green water is the difficulty herons (protected in our state) have to catch fish. It is the best food for fish of all sizes. We can still see the fish clearly during feeding time. :)
     
  14. Virginia ranchu

    Virginia ranchu Professional Breeder

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2008
    Location:
    Arlington, Virginia
    duckweed is a good alternative. It grows very quickly and covers the surface...removing ammonia just like the algae does, but you can thin it out with a net.
     
  15. Faebinder

    Faebinder Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2015
    Location:
    Hershey, PA
    Unfortunately, duckweed in the winter is a dead case for me. My indoor temporary tank is holding some quarantines and now has pea soup green water. If I place duckweed in it, it just goes into the HOB filter. My spoiled brats wont even eat it.
     

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