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High ammonia level in tap water

Discussion in 'Water Maintainence' started by Monie_25, Jan 15, 2016.

  1. Monie_25

    Monie_25 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2015
    Location:
    Texas
    I have just transferred colleges and moved to a new city. My water tests and parameters were usually fine at my old school and my parents house, but the water here reads 1ppm ammonia straight from the tap. I have not had a chance to test for mitrites or nitrates yet but i am worried about it. Is there any way for a broke college student to lower the ammonia level in the tap? My poor fish deserves better than that:/
     
  2. shakaho

    shakaho Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Location:
    Orlando FL
    What test kit are you using?

    I assume you have a cycled tank. Correct? Your filter bacteria will use the ammonia from the tap water, however you must do small daily water changes rather than a large weekly change (at least for a while). I suggest changing 10% of the water daily. To be sure your fish gets no harm at all from the ammonia in the tap, use Seachem Prime water conditioner which can make up to 1 ppp ammonia safe for your fish.
     
  3. Fishheadz

    Fishheadz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2014
    Location:
    Moffat, CO.
    No need to do daily water changes. My tap water comes out @ 2 ppm Ammonia(the highest concentration allowed by federal regulation), as my city uses Chloramine (Chlorine & Ammonia) to treat the municipal water supply. (I always use a double dose of Prime due to this)
    I only do 1 - 80% WC week.
    Monitor your water daily with a quality test kit, like API Freshwater Master Test Kit.
    Seachem Prime will detoxify 1 ppm Ammonia, for up to 48 hrs.
    If your aquarium is cycled, the bacteria should be able to consume that amount of Ammonia within the stated time frame, 48 hrs.
    If at 48 hrs there is still Ammonia present (even 0.25), redose Seachem Prime.
    If at 48 hrs there is still a higher level of Ammonia (above 0.50) Redose Seachem Prime, and you may need to increase the surface area (or rather the volume of biological filter media) for beneficial bacteria. This could be achieved with something as simple as a sponge filter, an additional H.O.B or additional canister filter.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2016
  4. Monie_25

    Monie_25 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2015
    Location:
    Texas
    My tank was cycled before I moved, however I am having an ammonia spike because my old filter was defected and stopped working, so I just installed a new filter from a different brand. I use the API freshwater master kit. I'm just having a run of bad luck lately:(
     
  5. shakaho

    shakaho Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Location:
    Orlando FL
    Seachem Prime will "inactivate" up to 1.0 ppm ammonia, but has to be dosed every 48 hours. However, your fish also produces ammonia, so you will have more than 1.0 ppm ammonia. Try the following:

    Double dose Prime.

    Greatly decrease the amount you feed your fish. The ammonia fish produce comes from protein in the fish food. Cut the amount you feed per day in half and feed that every other day. Your fish will not starve. To make yourself feel better, you can shred and steam/ microwave some leafy greens, like spinach and feed that. Typically the fish will not recognize this as edible at first, but will sample it after getting hungry enough. Do not use high-protein veggies like peas.

    Check into a source of purified water in large sizes. wally-world usually carries this and I've seen it at HD or Lowes. Mix this half and half with your tap water and use that for water changes.

    Since your tank has not cycled, you need much larger water changes than I recommended above. Try 30% a day, and if that doesn't keep the ammonia under control go to 50% daily.
     

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