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How Big of a Tank Do You Need For An Oranda?

Discussion in 'All Questions from Newbies' started by HotPocket, Jan 19, 2016.

  1. HotPocket

    HotPocket Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Location:
    Texas
    I have 2 orandas in a 20 gallon tank right now and one is sick and id like to separate them, and it would also give them more room. i have an extra tank that is presumably a terrarium because of a lid with holes in it, but i bought it for 10 bucks and it looks like it was used for fish previously because it also came with a lot of fish decor.i would think its a 20 gallon long or a 10 gallon long, probably 20 because it is pretty big but i dont know much about long tanks i just know what i see and what i know is its close to the size in length as my regular 20 gallon i have, but its like shorter in height. also would i need a lid/roof for the tank?
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2016
  2. CaliGold

    CaliGold Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2015
    Location:
    South Carolina
    I would be less worried about having a lid for the tank than it really being able to hold water without breaking. The glass used for terrariums is generally a little thinner than what they use to make aquariums, I think. So fill it with water and let it sit a few days to make sure it won't spring a leak.
     
  3. MikeM

    MikeM Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2015
    Location:
    Meadville pa
    No you shouldn't need a lid unless you want one. The fish won't get enough speed to jump out, and the lids are sometimes more expensive. Not having a lid also helps with oxygen exchange.
     
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  4. Jackie's Goldfish

    Jackie's Goldfish Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2014
    Location:
    CA USA
    The rule for fancy goldfish is 1 fish= 20 gal and any additional fish is 10 gal added
     
  5. joe

    joe Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2008
    Location:
    I live in Miami Florida
    There really is not a real rule. You have to take into account the length and girth of a fish and what you are willing to do regarding the extent of your water changes and type of filtration you have.You also want your fish to reach their full potential. You achieve this by low stocking levels in your tank, large weekly water changes, excellent food and filtration. For me I allow at least 20 gallons of water for each 4-5 inch twin tailed fish. For single tail fish I would allow 30 gallons for each fish along with large weekly water changes and good filtration. You have to figure out what works for you and how hard you are willing to work to maintain excellent conditions.
     
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  6. Fishheadz

    Fishheadz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2014
    Location:
    Moffat, CO.
    I say bigger, is always better. The more water volume available, the longer it takes for toxins to accumulate. (or rather toxins won't accumulate as much in between your weekly water changes). As well as allowing the fish ample room to swim, and maneuver about.
    It is my humblest opinion, that goldfish do better in an aquarium that contains other goldfish, vs. being alone.
     
  7. shakaho

    shakaho Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Location:
    Orlando FL
    A tank that is as long as a 20 gallon, but not as tall holds less than 20 gallons.
     
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  8. Fishheadz

    Fishheadz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2014
    Location:
    Moffat, CO.
    That depends on the 20 gallon. Here's 3 examples of 20 gallon aquariums, ...each have a different length, and height.
    20 long ........... 30" x 12" x 12"
    20 High ...........24" x 12" x 16"
    20 extra high....20" x 10" x 24"
     
  9. shakaho

    shakaho Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Location:
    Orlando FL
    The only kind of commercially-available tank that would match one of those in length, have less height, (and more width) and still hold 20 gallons might be a 24" long 20B. I can't find one of these on line and have never seen one, but they may exist. I once saw a 10B in a pet shop.
     
  10. Lou

    Lou Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2015
    Location:
    Western Michigan
    Measure the dimensions of both tanks and that will end all guessing.
     
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  11. HotPocket

    HotPocket Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Location:
    Texas
    Its 24x12x12
     
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  12. Lou

    Lou Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2015
    Location:
    Western Michigan
    That is a 15 gallon tank. That means the one you have is a 20 gallon (tall) tank. The 20 gallon (long) is longer (30").
     
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