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New here, need some help

Discussion in 'New Members' Area' started by CalicoGold, Jan 13, 2016.

  1. CalicoGold

    CalicoGold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2016
    Location:
    USA
    Hi there!

    I recently took in some fancy goldfish from my local facebook aquarium group that were in need of "rescuing." I've kept fish before, but never goldfish. I got the fish and the tank for an amazing deal and it was only after I got them that I started really reading up on goldfish specific care. The main problem is that I think my tank is already overstocked with three small-medium sized goldfish (it's a 30 gallon tank). The second problem is that when I got the tank and the fish the previous owner wanted to keep his filter so that didn't come along with them. I bought a new one from the pet shop that same day but it obviously isn't cycled (I am familiar with cycling a tank). I didn't think to ask the previous owner to give me some of his used filter media, I may still be able to ask him for some?) The fish do look good to me and seem healthy, so that's a plus.

    Since this was a bit of a spur of the moment decision I am not really in a position to go out and buy a brand new tank. I decided to come here and get some recommendations and help. Thanks!
     
  2. CaliGold

    CaliGold Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2015
    Location:
    South Carolina
    Hey CalicoGold, welcome to the forum! Your name made me do a quick double-take, by the way ;)

    A 30 gallon tank will work in the short term for the 3 little goldfish as long as you really keep up with the water changes (key is large and frequent), and keep a close eye on water quality and feeding (not overfeeding). Since you're doing a fish-in cycle now, you'll want to do once-a-day large (75-90%) water changes, and test the water with an API Master test kit to monitor ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate levels. I know you said you're on a budget, but if the filter you got isn't rated for at least a 60 gallon set-up, see if you can try and return it and get one that is. Luckily most indoor goldfish tanks don't require a heater (they're fine between 65-75 degrees, which is usually a common indoor temp). Lights for the tank are also optional, so you don't have to worry about those either. An airstone is usually a good idea, as it helps agitate the waters surface which results in better oxygenation of the water, which is extra helpful with goldfish. Also, during the cycling period, feed your new little fishies a little more sparingly than you normally would, it helps reduce toxins building up too quickly. The best diet for goldfish seems to be a variety; frozen bloodworms, fresh veggies, gel food, and good sinking pellets are all good options. Poke around in our food-dedicated threads for some help figuring them out.

    If you could give us just a tiny bit more info about what you've got set up so far, I'm sure we can give you many more tips and advice. What brand/size filter are you using? What substrate, if any, do you have and how deep is it? What food are you giving the goldfish right now? Hopefully your little guys are still doing well, and kuddos for rescuing them!
     
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  3. CalicoGold

    CalicoGold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2016
    Location:
    USA
    Hi CaliGold, we do have almost the same name!

    Thank you so much for getting back to me so quickly. The filter is the only thing that the tank didn't already come with, so I don't need to worry too much about getting supplies. The one I have says on the box "for up to 75 gallon aquarium," so that should be okay? I do have an air pump and a rather big air stone luckily! I also have a heater in there, it's at around 70-72 right now, is that fine or should I opt to take it out? I first had them in cooler water but they seemed really sluggish so I turned up the heater and bit and they seemed to get much perkier in the 70 degree water. I will make sure to feed them lightly during this time! I am doing daily water changes too. I do have the API water testing kit, it's the one with drops, but it is several years old at this point, do you know if they go bad or am I still okay to be using it? The food I got with them is flakes, I know that isn't the best, so I have mostly been feeding them frozen bloodworms that I already had on hand (I have some african dwarf frogs already) and I feed them a little bit of the flakes but I let them soak in water for a few seconds first. I will definitely be getting some better food soon! I get paid in 3 days so I was going to do a big amazon order for food. I read repashy makes a good food? I am familiar with repashy foods as I have a crested gecko and gargoyle gecko that eat repashy food. Do you have suggestions for what types of food I should order for them? The substrate is just standard aquarium gravel, it looks to be maybe 1" deep. There were some plastic plants in there before too but frankly they seemed sharp and looked ugly so I took them out. I got the tank, stand, equipment (minus filter), etc. for $70 so it was a really good deal and I otherwise would not have been able to afford to set up a new tank like this.

    Thanks again for all the help!
     
    CaliGold likes this.
  4. mjfromga

    mjfromga Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2015
    Location:
    At Home
    Repashy Soilent Green is great! Go with that. Your filter is fine for now, just keep it cleaned out. Like CaliGold said, LARGE water changes very frequently. Adding Seachem Prime or Tetra Safestart may help speed the cycling process. Leave the heater, its normal for fish to get sluggish in colder water, they sort of hibernate, but I like active happy fish that aren't chilly. Mine stays at 73-74 degrees. Gravel is a tad too deep for most preferences, but mine is that deep because I don't like the look of a very thin substrate layer, and my fishies are fine. The test kit is probably okay to use, test it out and see if you get consistent readings. If you do, it's probably still okay. If the readings are way different back to back, it's probably too old and needs to be replaced. Your tank is only SLIGHTLY overstocked and you should be fine for a while.
     
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  5. shakaho

    shakaho Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Location:
    Orlando FL
    Your tank hasn't cycled and ammonia comes from protein in food. Please leave the frozen bloodworms in the freezer. During fish-in cycle you should feed low-protein food in small amounts (even just every other day). This won't harm the fish, and you can give them the "good stuff" once your tank has cycled.

    I assume the gravel came with the tank? If so good news, since this will contain nitrifiers to seed your new filter. Don't remove any of it until cycling has completed. Use the test kit, and order a new one.

    Do you have Seachem Prime water conditioner? If not, please get some since it can inactivate small amounts of ammonia and nitrite to keep your fish safe between water changes.
     
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  6. CaliGold

    CaliGold Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2015
    Location:
    South Carolina
    You look like you're already off to a better start than most! I agree with shakaho and mjfromga, the filter is a good size, not to worry. Repashy's Soilent Green is the gel food that generally gets recommended for goldfish keepers, and it's a very good staple. Until the tank is cycled though, feeding the soaked fish flakes will propably be sufficient.

    Seachem Prime as a water conditioner is also a go-to around here, shakaho is very right to advise using that. And the heater is your choice, if your home is on the cooler side, it might be a good idea, but goldfish are pretty hardy. I'm not sure if lower temps would have an effect on the cycling, though.

    Good job taking out the pointy plants and decorations, too! Goldfish can definitely be sensitive about stuff like that.

    Good luck!
     
  7. Fishheadz

    Fishheadz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2014
    Location:
    Moffat, CO.
    Welcome to the GFK forum, sounds like you're off to a pretty good start.Most likely due to your knowledge and skills keeping other fish. Goldfish are not like most other fish kept, they have some special requirements.
    Lots of fresh water, good food, and an enormous amount of love.

    I agree with the above posts with a few slight contradictions, Seachem Prime is a Dechlorinator (& Detoxifier for Ammonia, NitrIte, and NitrAte) it will not speed up the cycle time, nor will it slow the process in any way. Rather, Seachem Stability is the beneficial bacteria supplement, that may help reduce the overall time it takes to get the aquariums bacteria colonies established.

    You could also get a sponge filter and add that to your air stone, it will be another place that beneficial bacteria can colonize, while also aerating the water, and agitating the surface to promote gaseous exchange.

    Also, it is of my honest and humblest of opinions that lighting is not optional. I feel that lighting is important to fish, as not only will it allow you to see/observe your fish better, it may also help with coloration. In specific I recall reading an article just a few days ago of a goldfish that was intended as food for another fish but had escaped its demise and had been living in an enormous sump with no light for an extended period of time(years), it had lost nearly all pigmentation.

    With that said, you can spend as little or as much as you'd like on lighting. You can probably pick up a regular T5/T8 aquarium fixture for $25 or so.
    Personally I really like the Current USA Freshwater L.E.D+ line of lights,(I'm unsure if PetCo or PetSmart carry these, I ordered mine online), they are a bit pricey, but offer some really nice features.(very thin, sleek, low profile fixture only1/2" thick, wireless remote, ANY color,21 presets including morning,daylight, clouds, night, night clouds, storm,etc, 4 of the presets can be customized to a specific color, multiple lights can be controled by a single remote). On these I suggest if you have a 24" wide aquarium to get the 24"-36 unit, cost is around $140. If your aquarium is 36" wide I'd suggest the 36"-48" unit, cost is around $200. Although with the cost of these it might be good to plan ahead. If you plan on upgrading their aquarium to an aquarium that is 48" (55g,75g,90g120g) or wider(they do not extend further than 60"), I would suggest the 48"-60" unit. (and just allow it to hang 6" over both sides of the 30g until you upgrade), they run around $240. (I run 2 of these on my custom 60" wide 140g, and 1 on my standard 55g, all 3 I can control w/ 1 remote, very pleased)
    YouTube has some pretty good videos that capture all of the different lighting modes.

    As for aquarium upgrades, both PetCo, & PetSmart have $1 per gallon sales on their aquariums about every 3 months. These sales are only good on aquariums 55g & under. And it is just the aquarium only, no hood or light.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2016
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  8. GoldenMcNewbie

    GoldenMcNewbie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 22, 2015
    Location:
    Oklahoma City
    I like grow lamps lol. You can grow plants with them, and they cost less than most tank lights.
     
  9. CalicoGold

    CalicoGold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2016
    Location:
    USA
    Thank you all for the tips! I think I was a lot more worried when I first came here because someone on a different website (one that isn't centered at all around fish keeping funnily enough) kind of blew up at me and told me I needed to get a tank that is 55 gallons for one fist and 35 gallons for each additional goldfish, so that would be like a 120+ gallon fish tank? Which isn't at all possible for me so I was just worried about what I should do.

    My tank does have a light, but it's nothing fancy, it came with the tank. I think I will eventually want to buy a new one has a sort of ugly yellow glow, but it's fine for now. The gravel did come with the tank so hopefully that will help the cycle! I added the water conditioner (Seachem) to the list of things I will be ordering from amazon. I can get the stability product too, I assume it's the same as tetra safestart, which I am familiar with? If that's the case would I need to worry about it being shipped to me in the cold weather right now?

    I will stop feeding blood worms and feed much more lightly with the flakes. And thank you for the food recommendation as well.
     
  10. GoldenMcNewbie

    GoldenMcNewbie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 22, 2015
    Location:
    Oklahoma City
    Stability doesn't work as fast as Tetra Safestart. I go by 20 gallons for the first and 10 for each additional fish.
     
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  11. mjfromga

    mjfromga Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2015
    Location:
    At Home
    I got my aquarium brand new about 4 days before I got my fish, and I didn't know a shred about cycling a tank. I used Tetra Safe start, Tetra Easy Balance, and Jungle Start Zyme and my fish guys are perfectly fine. I literally just put a ton of that stuff in there and they were bright and healthy from the start. Sometimes I wonder if certain things are as important as some people make them out to be.
     
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  12. MikeM

    MikeM Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2015
    Location:
    Meadville pa
    Just to add to what fishheadz said, I believe that Petco is still having their dollar a gallon sale right now. I just got my new tank about 2 weeks ago
     
  13. mjfromga

    mjfromga Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2015
    Location:
    At Home
    I believe it runs until the 23rd.
     
  14. CalicoGold

    CalicoGold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2016
    Location:
    USA
    I just found out about the dollar gallon sale. I measured and could easily fit a 55 gallon tank where I have my 30 gallon, but the biggest problem is the stand. Everywhere I look online I can only find stands going to somewhere around $100+. Even stands for a 40 gallon get pretty expensive. I'm not sure it would be worth it for me to spend so much just to get an extra 10 gallons. I feel like if I'm going to upgrade I should get something a lot bigger. I kept tropical fish many years ago and I had pretty big tanks back then too, but I sold them all when I got out of tropical fish keeping. I really wish I still had my old 75 gallon tank!
     
  15. Joshua's golds

    Joshua's golds Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2015
    Location:
    St Petersburg, florida

    Yeah I know what u mean Cali, my next tank I would want to invest in will be really big, way to big for my apt... I have a 30 gal and a 55 gal plus my quarantine 20 gal, I think my next purchase will be a 100 gal stock tank... Plan on putting it on castor rollers so I can place it under a large desk and roll it in out to feed and care for the fish. I live in a smaller apartment in a high-rise so I have to get creative with space and storage...
     
  16. Lou

    Lou Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2015
    Location:
    Western Michigan
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  17. Joshua's golds

    Joshua's golds Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2015
    Location:
    St Petersburg, florida
    Thanks


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  18. Joshua's golds

    Joshua's golds Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2015
    Location:
    St Petersburg, florida
  19. CalicoGold

    CalicoGold Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2016
    Location:
    USA
  20. Fishheadz

    Fishheadz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2014
    Location:
    Moffat, CO.
    When measuring aquariums the dimensions are always given as Length (from end to end) x Width (front to back) x Height (bottom to top)
    40g long = 48"x13"x16", 40g breeder=36" x18"x16". (the 40 Breeder would be best, as it offers slightly more surface area(L x W) than the 40long. (40B=36"x18"=648², as where the 40L= 48"x13"=624²)
    As for a stand, I use one of the double metal stands for my 55g, and I have my Fluval 406 & a 10g (with a few plants I'm wintering over for the outdoor pond), on the bottom.
    You could get one new for $75-100, or sometimes you can find just a stand on Craigslist, (usually the owner has busted their aquarium and just wants rid of the stand)
    Another option (depending on your skills and available tools, or willing friends with skills & tools) build your own stand out of 2"x4"s & 3" wood screws. This could likely be done for $20-30.

    A general rule of thumb is 20g for the first fish & 10g for each additional fish. Though the fish's size should also be taken into consideration. Probably not a real good idea to cram 5 fully grown fish in a 55g, I would go 20/17.5/17.5, so 3 fish, max. Fancy varieties can grow upwardly of 6"+, Single tails can grow upwardly of 12"+.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2016
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