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Pearlscale Standard (crown)

Discussion in 'Goldfish Breeds' started by GreenTea, Aug 24, 2014.

  1. GreenTea

    GreenTea Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2012
    Location:
    Washington
    There are several threads on standards for different varieties but I couldn't find any pearlscale standard articles here, or a pearlscale culling article. A quick Google search is also nearly useless other than the very basics.

    The AGA site has some older (and a revised) standard which I'll show here and I found a few other illustrations which I thought might be helpful. Pearlscale keepers are certainly in the minority here but in the interest of representing different varieties I am hoping this will be helpful to any newcomers or those interested.

    Here are the old pearlscale standards and comments courtesy of the AGA. I hope its ok to share these - I thought it might be nice to have them consolidated here on the forum along with others for comments and viewing.

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    This is a nice actual example of the difference in the head growth.

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    These I found in an attempt to find illustrations, not sure of the source. The first example is a crown, and the second is a hama nishiki example. These also show some color options which is helpful.

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    From my own young fish, I'll show my better (not perfect) pearlscales, a sort of middle of the road pearlscale, and two with more obvious faults.

    Poorer fish first.

    The first fish has nice deep color but is lacking the rounded body shape. This fish also has too much head growth in other areas of the face, giving it a bit of a frog like appearance. It does not have the correct back curvature either.

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    Seen here next to a more rotund sibling for body comparison.

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    This second fish has interesting color but the caudal is very stiff and sits nearly fully horizontal and creates an awkward swimming motion. It lacks well developed pearls. This fish also has too much head growth in the cheeks and lacks a very round body. Here compared to a sibling.

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    So - so pearlscale is up next. This fish has a rounder body and good color.

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    Compared with siblings.

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    These last two are my best pearlscales. Keep in mind these are all juveniles and still developing. They came with some minor issues that I can't remedy like curled fins and broken rays in some cases. What I like about these is the very round bodies, proportions of fins to body, back curvature and overall balanced swimming motion and appearance.

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    This is by no means a comprehensive or perfect guide, but I wanted to put something together. I'm hoping more examples and info can be added by other members here.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2014
    Naerwyn, tObi and Rabbit229 like this.
  2. mikel

    mikel Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2010
    I need to set up a special tank for these cuties. They are really really adorable...

    heck out the crown pearlscales from the vietnam club...



    and...

     
  3. joe

    joe Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2008
    Location:
    I live in Miami Florida
    very robust fish
     
  4. tObi

    tObi Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2015
    Location:
    Philippines
    I love them pearls too!... They're so darn cute!... Sharing my adult pingpong...

    Hand for scale..
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    Front and side tank view
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    And of course the video



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  5. Big Red

    Big Red Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2014
    Location:
    South Africa
    I noticed that the standards call for what looks like a veil tail- something I've never seen on a pearl scale. Mine has a short tail and it suits the fish very nicely, just like a short tail suits a ryukin. Your fish appear to have fan tails, which is more realistic than a veil tail.
     
  6. fantail1

    fantail1 Professional Breeder

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2010
    Location:
    Bedfordshire, England
    I noticed that too. The UK standards require a shorter, forked tail so I was surprised by the US drawings. The imported fish I see have the shorted forked tail but held lower (at about the horizontal). The big problem with Pearlscales is the poor colour - too many end up like "beige tennis balls". There seems to be so little blue, black and red. Maybe too much effort has gone into the body shape (which personally I struggle with as they seem too often to struggle to swim)?
     
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  7. joe

    joe Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2008
    Location:
    I live in Miami Florida
    I have noticed a "hump" on his fish, wonder if this a ryukin cross as the pearl scales are not the pronounced
     
  8. Ununique

    Ununique Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2015
    Location:
    Lancaster, Pa
    Presumably a lot of the coloration potential is lost because its below the deposits in the skin, even in highly colorful ones they still tend to be a little washed out or pastel looking due to the mostly white background.
     
  9. fantail1

    fantail1 Professional Breeder

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2010
    Location:
    Bedfordshire, England
    I confess I don't know. I always assumed pearlscales were distorted scales rather than normal scales with a deposit on top of them. The question then would be why doesn't the colour extend to more of the deposits? Why is it limited to relatively few scales and why would cream / beige / pale orange still show. Why not the other colours albeit in pastel tones? I have no idea.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  10. nolaveils

    nolaveils Breeder

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2010
    Location:
    New Orleans
    Many of the pearlscales imported into the US from the 1920's to 70's had short broadtails, not fantails, so the broadtail was preferred during that time. The problem with producing crown pearlscales to a standard is similiar to the problem of producing a good broadtail oranda. In the case of the crown pearlscale, the pearls are ususally not as developed as compared to a pure pearlscale and the wen or crown not as good as in a pure oranda.
     
  11. fantail1

    fantail1 Professional Breeder

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2010
    Location:
    Bedfordshire, England
    Interesting - the issue of compromise raises its head again. You can have a hood (or equivalent) but you lose pearling; you can have pearling but you lose colour; you can have a hood but not a veil tail.

    In the 1960s (certainly by the 1970s) the GSGB set its stall out by saying that no standard variety could show the characteristics of another variety. That was an attempt to keep varietal purity. That was breached with the veiltail Oranda and more recently the Ryukin and Fantail (one is arguably a poor version of the other and vice versa). In many ways that purity had the advantage of ensuring the qualities of the variety were maintained and not compromised.

    However, the standards went on to say that the special characteristic of the variety should be enhanced to its maximum. So that can mean bubbles on a bubble-eye so large that the fish cannot lift its head off the floor. Clearly that isn't right (as development like that was not realistic at the time it was not an issue) - so we need to look for a balanced fish (in my opinion) instead.
     
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  12. mikel

    mikel Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2010
    My baby Crown Pearlscales are here! They look great and I love their little chubby bodies. Only 2 inches but I look forward to growing them out once they are out of quarantine. I think I might get two more from Coast Gem...they are so cute. Hope you like them;)



     
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  13. Big Red

    Big Red Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2014
    Location:
    South Africa
    Very nice fish Mikel! I must say, I prefer an orange and white fish over a calico. While calico looks bright and vibrant on other fish, it often appears drained and washed-out on a pearlscale.
     
  14. Big Red

    Big Red Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2014
    Location:
    South Africa
    Found this awesome website on pearlscales: pearlscale.weebly.com
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2016
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  15. tObi

    tObi Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2015
    Location:
    Philippines
    My new copped... Red & White Ping-pong pearlscale...

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  16. Big Red

    Big Red Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2014
    Location:
    South Africa
    Very nice tObi! Did you breed this one yourself?
     
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  17. QandO

    QandO Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2016
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Does anyone know of a good US breeder or supplier for ping-pong pearlscales (not crowned)?
     
  18. Big Red

    Big Red Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2014
    Location:
    South Africa
    I'm a huge fan of the traditional ping-pong pearlscale, they've become more rare than crown pearlscales these days!
     
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  19. QandO

    QandO Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2016
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    I really love these guys too. I had two beauties. One unfortunately got floaty and then succumbed to an infection I was unsuccessful in treating and the other has been twice attacked by my big oranda... my remaining girl now is blind! The oranda sucked out both her eyes in each attack and removed many scales. I am beyond upset that I put her back in the same tank after the first attack. Other than being blind she is still happy and round and beautiful. I would love to have a tank of just traditional ping-pong pearlscales. I just love watching them float and blub around yet be so graceful despite their body habitus...
     
  20. Big Red

    Big Red Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2014
    Location:
    South Africa
    Shame, thats unfortunate! At least your fish is happy and healthy☺ I recently bought two ping-pongs, I know that one is male but I dont know the sex of the second one yet, hoping its a female so I can breed some, would be awesome to start a line.
     

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