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Pond Pumps for outside of the Pond.

Discussion in 'Goldfish in the Pond' started by KimA., Jul 31, 2017.

  1. KimA.

    KimA. Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2016
    Location:
    California
    Do any of you NOT use a submersible pump for the pond? Can I see some pictures of your setup?

    I've been told that the in-water pumps use a ton of electricity.

    Thanks! Kim:)
     
  2. Ponder

    Ponder Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2016
    Location:
    Virginia
    We use an external pump and filter set up. It is housed in our garage, but it's not necessary to keep it indoors. This is a version of our system:

    http://www.seagatefilters.com/Mediu...2000-Xtreme-Filter-and-Pump-Systems-p-54.html

    I've also read that pumps in the pond may attract lightening which can damage your fish. That said, I do have a 150 gallon water trough "pond" with a submersible pump.

    I think you will find that most "larger" ponds have outside pumps and filters. They are much easier to maintain.
     
  3. shakaho

    shakaho Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Location:
    Orlando FL
    I don't know where you heard that, but most pumps are pretty efficient. Compare an external pump with a submersible. I just pulled out two popular pumps of similar power, and the submersible pumps a little more water, costs much less, and uses less energy.

    How big a pond do you want? External pumps are usually used in koi ponds that are measured in tens of thousands of gallons. Your pump should turn over 2X the pond volume per hour, so unless you are going over 1000 gallons, you might find it hard to find an external pump.

    I've seen a number of people say that external pumps are quieter than submersibles, but I don't know how something gets quieter than too quiet to hear. My pumps are all submersible, and I can only tell they are running by seeing the water flow. I have certainly heard some very noisy external pumps.

    My recommendation for a first pond is:

    Start with a container pond. Stock tanks make good ponds. A beginner can put together a good container pond, filter, and protective cover in a couple of days.

    Don't use an aquarium-shaped container. One of the advantages of a pond over an aquarium is the swimming and surface area of the pond. Most 100 gallon stock tanks have much the shape of an aquarium. Shallower and spacious is ideal.

    Build a DIY upflow biofilter using a container with about 1/10 the volume of the pond. This will be superior almost anything you can buy, isn't very difficult, and will teach you a lot.

    Don't put a fish in the pond until you have built a secure cover to keep predators out.

    Once you have learned how to build and maintain a container pond, you can start to plan your dream pond.
     
    KimA. and Crystal River like this.
  4. Ponder

    Ponder Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2016
    Location:
    Virginia
    That's very good advice. My first pond was a stock tank. I still use it for quarantine and growing smaller fish that I don't want to subject to the spawning craziness of the pond. You can get them in many different sizes, up to 600 hundred or so gallons, and they aren't that expensive.
     
  5. KimA.

    KimA. Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2016
    Location:
    California
    Thanks. I have my 625 gallon stock tank (finally!) and am overwhelmed by all the filter and pump info out there. :confused:
     
  6. Ponder

    Ponder Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2016
    Location:
    Virginia
    The best site I have found for pond building information is Koiphen. Obviously, they are primarily focused on koi, but they have tons of information on keeping any type of pond fish. The amount of information there is pretty overwhelming, but it's worth spending the time on that site to find what you need to know.

    If I were in your shoes, for a filter, I would look into a small Birdman sand and gravel filer, and/or a small Bakki shower, both of which you can build yourself.

    Sounds like you are off to a good start with that tank.
     
    KimA. likes this.
  7. Faebinder

    Faebinder Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2015
    Location:
    Hershey, PA
    The laguna submersibles are very good. The pre-pump cage filters big solids and the rest goes through. I use it for my bog and for my regular filter.
     
    KimA. likes this.
  8. KimA.

    KimA. Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2016
    Location:
    California
    If I make a filter using a drum, is it easy to attach a UV light?
     
  9. shakaho

    shakaho Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Location:
    Orlando FL
    I'm sure it isn't easy, but I wouldn't attach a UV light if it was. Killing microbes at random makes no sense to me.
     
  10. KimA.

    KimA. Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2016
    Location:
    California
    The tank will be getting full afternoon sun, so I'd better keep it under a sun shade.
     
  11. Ichthius

    Ichthius Professional Breeder

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2008
    Location:
    Eugene Oregon
    KimA. likes this.

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