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Power failure question

Discussion in 'Goldfish Conversation' started by goldfishntn, Jan 14, 2016.

  1. goldfishntn

    goldfishntn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2014
    Location:
    Tn/USA
    I had posted awhile back about in case of power failure how do you power your tanks. I had a great answer by blue belly.
    Using my 75 gallon with 5 golds and a can and hob filter, air pump...as an example.
    In a perfect world, these things can be powered up by generator or car, etc and run until the power comes back.
    But everything isn't always perfect.
    If I had to ration out power, how much and how often do I need to temporarily power these things, filters/air, up to keep the fish ok?
    I had wondered if there were a battery powered submersible pump that I could drop in there to help with sitrring the water to increase oxygenation. But I couldn't find one.
     
  2. Fishheadz

    Fishheadz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2014
    Location:
    Moffat, CO.
    Yes there are battery powered air pumps, here is some link's to some:
    http://www.ebay.com/bhp/battery-aerator
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/DC-12V-70L-...r-Air-Pump-Air-Inflated-Aerator-/290781296258
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Marine-Metal-Aeration-System-12-V-Dc-W-Bilge-Pump-Kit-/201486294846
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/12V-Aquariu...ion-Hi-Pressure-DC-Air-Pump-902-/161816181342
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Marine-Metal-Aeration-System-12V-DC-With-Bilge-Pump-Kit-SS212-/191646176190

    Some of these small ones run on 1 or 2 D cell batteries these usually only aerate 3-10 gallons. The larger ones that are 12v can be ran on a car battery when no electricity is available, OR a standard 12V power supply when electricity is available.

    I know about these because my roommate is an avid fisherman, and uses a "Baby Bubbles" to help keep his minnows alive longer. He has also uses it (with a separate tube & airstone) to aerate his homemade compost tea.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2016
    thePhysicist and goldfishntn like this.
  3. goldfishntn

    goldfishntn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2014
    Location:
    Tn/USA
    I'm wondering if one or two of these would be good to keep on hand in the event of a power fail.
    Put in the tank to keep the water moving and increase aeration until power returns.
     
  4. Fishheadz

    Fishheadz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2014
    Location:
    Moffat, CO.
    Sorry, I meant to say, that I feel that one of the larger (12V) ones should be sufficient to run a larger setup(40-60g), I kind of like the looks/(specs) on some of the bigger ones with bilge pump & spray bar, in particular.

    Also it doesn't hurt to be prepared, especially if you live in an area with inclimate weather, and power outages.
    I'm in OKC,OK the heart of the city, major metropolitan area, a few years ago, we got slammed with a bad ice storm, I had no electricity from the power company for the span of like 18 days, to compound matters, the house I was in was at the time was "all electric". I ended up getting a nice 5,000W gas generator, and a couple heavy duty 10-3* extension cords @ 50' &100'. *(10 gauge, 3 strands).

    For a prolonged outage even a smaller generator would be ideal, as the biggest concern is crashing your system. i.e no electricity = no filter = diminishing water quality beyond 48-72 hrs.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2016
    goldfishntn likes this.
  5. goldfishntn

    goldfishntn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2014
    Location:
    Tn/USA
    I do have a generator. I was just wondering about a workaround in case I needed to use those generator outlets for other things. I could alternate them awhile I guess.
     
  6. Scifisarah

    Scifisarah Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2016
    Location:
    Michigan
    You just need to make sure you have lots of extension cords and splicers on hand. Don't let the outlets on your generator limit you. You do need to know the limit of your generator of course. Calculate the wattages of the things you will need to plug in before your power goes out.
     
  7. Fishheadz

    Fishheadz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2014
    Location:
    Moffat, CO.
    Wattage is important, however it's the Amps that really matter. If you have a 5,000 Watt generator with 1 - 20 Amp circuit(most gen's this size will have 2 - 20 amp circuits), and you try to plug in something that uses 12 amps(vacuum cleaner, saw, etc), along with something that uses more than 8 amps, say a full size refrigerator, it will pop the breaker on the circuit.
    I also have a small 500 Watt gen, but its only good to run a cable modem, router, monitor, PC tower, and a lamp, though it has 2-110V, OR 1-12V output.
    It must be understood that you can not power an entire house on a 5000 W gen., rather a few "important" things like your fridge/freezer, aquarium, or other needed items. Though Generac does make some whole house solutions, those are extremely costly.
     
  8. Scifisarah

    Scifisarah Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2016
    Location:
    Michigan
    Hmm, I did not know that about the Amps. I have written Watts: 7500 Amps: 62.5/31.3 on our owner's manual, I will have to double check to see what that means. Our portable generator plugs into our garage and a wire runs to a separate circuit breaker in our house. We are on the top of a big hill at the end of a dead end road with lots of big trees around and we lose power quite frequently. I hunt deer, so when the power kept going out I was mostly freaking out about my deep freezer full of venison. :)

    This battery backup pump was recommended by Preuss Pets: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004PBIKHU/?tag=amzffny-20

    And this one gets slightly better reviews: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B003TLWXOS/?tag=amzffny-20

    Might want a couple for a bigger tank, although I'm not certain since I haven't used them before.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2016

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