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Recycling water for indoor tanks

Discussion in 'Advance Water Quality' started by Cincy Ranchu, Jul 22, 2015.

  1. Cincy Ranchu

    Cincy Ranchu Professional Breeder

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2008
    Location:
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    anybody doing80-100% recycle of water used in your tanks. It seems to me that we can easily remove all the particulate matter and ammonia. Salt and perhaps nitrates are the key factors. Is development of this treatment path of interest to anyone?
     
  2. Fishheadz

    Fishheadz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2014
    Location:
    Moffat, CO.
    I recycle 100% of my tank waste water every week(90% tank volume, about 120g), it goes into the flower beds.
    Though, I get the feeling that you are talking about a bit of a different type of recycling. Here in OK, there is a company that is called "Chappell Supply" their slogan is; "We treat water like the next gold". Their commercials show how well their filtration system works, it takes wastewater(nasty brown with floating material) and turns it back into drinkable water. They are a small business, but allegedly service the entire USA, with just 9 technicians. You might consider looking into one of their systems, if for nothing else, educational purposes, as their systems are not cheap.

    http://www.chappellsupply.com/
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2015
  3. *Ci*

    *Ci* Goldie Guru

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2009
    Location:
    BC, Canada
    If you are refering to regenerating spent water to reuse in the pond or fishtank, then yes, there are a number of ways that people in the ponding community accomplish this. One can pump out the water into a holding tank and use high doses of oxidizers like PP or hydrogen peroxide, adjust KH and GH to original values and reuse. However, this does not remove nitrate, so you need to either dilute it with fresh water or have a filtration method the handles nitrate such as a trickle tower, shower, or sufficient plants, for it to be useful as a water change.
    A variation of this method, which I use myself, are regular low doses of PP (1-2ppm) right in the pond or aquarium, which "cleans" up dissolved organic compounds, bacteria, inhibits parasites and bacterial infections. Disclaimer is that you need to be very careful measuing and monitoring PP and have a full understaning of how it works before attempting.
     
  4. Cincy Ranchu

    Cincy Ranchu Professional Breeder

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2008
    Location:
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    In reality I am building a large industrial WWT that takes high organic liquids to near drinking water quality. I am curious if ultrafiltration followed by RO was worthwhile to some of the page member States?
     
    Virginia ranchu likes this.
  5. kitkat12

    kitkat12 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2015
    Location:
    U.S.
    Hey Ci, forgive me but what is PP that you refer to above?
     
  6. *Ci*

    *Ci* Goldie Guru

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2009
    Location:
    BC, Canada
    Potassium Permanganate.
     
  7. Virginia ranchu

    Virginia ranchu Professional Breeder

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2008
    Location:
    Arlington, Virginia
    In summer time, you could drain waste water to a bog for nitrogen removal before filtration and UV sterilization, in winter..... it would be tougher to remove nitrogen.
     
  8. bluebelly

    bluebelly Ambassador

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2008
    Location:
    chesterland,ohio,usa
    In the greenhouse I run the tank water thru a tub of bio-balls, then thru a tub of hyacenths or water lettuce,then back to the ponds. For lettuce, tomato and peppers I run the last of the water thru U V then to the growing produce. I will be doing some thing similar in the fish room at home,
     
    Virginia ranchu likes this.
  9. kitkat12

    kitkat12 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2015
    Location:
    U.S.
    Hey Bluebelly, I'm not that far from you. I would love to get together and see your setups, ponds, and fish- if you wouldn't mind? Thanks.
     
  10. Ununique

    Ununique Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2015
    Location:
    Lancaster, Pa
    This is a very interesting topic. I've read some research where a team used duckweed to do this as it apparently removes all sorts of water toxins.
    Of course if these things would re-enter the system if you feed the duckweed to your fish, so thats unfortunate.
    I do still have a couple tubs where I send waste to duckweed tubs.

    I believe the research was looking at the issue of cleaning waste water before draining to natural water ways.
     
  11. Aquayne

    Aquayne Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2016
    Location:
    Morganton, NC
    San Diego CA used water hyacinth in their water reclamation program. I believe to potable standards. It is one of the few plants that prefer nitrate over ammonia. Asian pig farms use Water hyacinth to neutralize the run off from the pig farming and manure processing.
     
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  12. gillian

    gillian Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2012
    Location:
    brooklyn, ny
    this is a fascinating topic. i try to be green as best as possible, but we all have flaws and contradictions in our lives. fish keeping certainly hurts my inner tree hugger. these ideas are all bigger than my scope, but i love reading about it. my only plan when the snow melts and my backyard door can open (blocked by ice), is to put in a rain barrel, which i intend to fill with my "dirty" tank water, then use it to water my garden. i am trying to grow a mostly native butterfly friendly garden.
     
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