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Setting up my indoor pond

Discussion in 'Goldfish Gear' started by Joshua's golds, Jan 26, 2016.

  1. Joshua's golds

    Joshua's golds Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2015
    Location:
    St Petersburg, florida
    I wanted to post some ideas that I having setting up my 100 gal stock tank in my apartment, and hopefully get some feed back from the more experienced fish keepers in this forum... Figured if I run it by u all before i buy any of the equipment, I'll save myself head aches further down the road.

    So fist off I plan on using a galvanized 100 gal 2'x2'x4 tub.

    And because I have read that the zinc coating could be harmful to some fish I wanted to make sure I had filtration that had active carbon in is to help remove the zinc that might leach into the water, on top of the mechanical filter I always run an extra sponge filter in all my tanks for the aeration it provides.

    I was looking at this canister filter on eBay, it seems reasonably priced and wondered if any one has used it or if I can even use a canister filter on this type of stock tank. All of my current tanks have HOB filters to the canister filter is completely new to me.

    http://www.ebay.com/ulk/itm/261876829966 [​IMG]


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  2. Lou

    Lou Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2015
    Location:
    Western Michigan
    Congrats, Joshua's golds. Stock tanks are the way to go if you do not have to view the fish from the side.

    I personally would not worry about zinc and bother with activated carbon. Before all the plastics, people (not just fish) use these to hold drinking water. Those who used this type of tanks had no problem. Those who had not used would concern about the leach of zinc. If you are really concerned, you can line it with 6 mil clear plastic so you do not see it easily. People use these even for aquaponics beds that is made of lumber.

    No matter what you do, try to raise the stock tank at least a few inches off the floor, it will make maintenance (siphoning) much easier.

    Now to filtration. Unless you want this to be a very clean looking setup, I personally would use more convenient filtration methods than canister filters due to the time it takes to clean them.

    Since you have experience using sponge filter (IIRC, you have the XY-380 in your tanks), you could actually filter that stock tank with 4-6 of these XY-380's. All you need to do is to alternate squeezing them during water change time. You do, however, need to get a decent air pump since the tank is 2' deep. You can get a small pond air pump in the range of 10-20 liters per minute and that should be adequate. You can also vertically stack these sponges so there are fewer "filters" in the tank but still the same amount of filtration.

    You can also use powerheads to power these sponge filters if you do not like the sound of bubbles.

    If you want even easier and convenient solids removal, you can use an overhead sump type of filter. Basically, you use some kind of tray/container that sits on top of your stock tank (you can even use a small stock tank, LOL). A small water pump (about 300-500 gph) pumps the water (with fish wastes) to the top of the container/tray. You can use a variety of filtration materials in that way. Later, all you need to do is to either remove/replace or clean the top layer which is to catch large solids. The filtered water is then return to the main tank.

    In your climate, you may want to avoid any waterfall type of return due to the increase in humidity. What you can do is a stand pipe type of return so there is no splash.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2016
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  3. csoth1

    csoth1 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2016
    Location:
    Raleigh, NC
    We're building a greenhouse this spring for grow out and plan to use Tuff Stuff 110 gallon tubs. I would recommend something along those lines instead of the metal tub. They're very cost effective per gallon, can be found in local stores (such as TSC) so no shipping, and come highly recommended by members of this forum from experience using them.

    http://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/pr...cts-heavy-duty-oval-tank-110-gal?cm_vc=IOPDP1
     
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  4. Aquayne

    Aquayne Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2016
    Location:
    Morganton, NC
    I hope you are on a concrete slab, 800 pounds is a lot of weight. I have a friend that had a lot of trouble with the weight of a 90,gallon discus tank. It ran parralel with the floor joists and caused the plywood sheething to buckle. We had to crawl under his house to add support to the floor. If you run across three floor joists and use timbers to raise the stock tank up as suggested. Make sure you have renter's insurance to cover water and weight damage.
     
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  5. Joshua's golds

    Joshua's golds Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2015
    Location:
    St Petersburg, florida
    Thanks Lou, lots of helpful info.... I think I will stick to the sponge methods, they seem easy and Aesthetically I think just he two air hoses going in will look better than trays or overhead sump. I can vacuum a lot of the solid waste with my water changes using my substrate vacuum... I will probably keep it bare bottom for easier removal of waste.

    As for top view I think butterflies are just as pretty top or side view, so I can enjoy them both ways I between my glass tanks and this stock tank.

    Thanks again for all ur helpful info.
     
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  6. Joshua's golds

    Joshua's golds Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2015
    Location:
    St Petersburg, florida

    I have concrete floors, I live in a very urban inspired high rise on the 12 floor, we have concrete counters, concrete floors exposed water pipes... So I think I'll be safe and I do have renters insurance too lol

    Also csoth1: I like the look for the galvanized metal with my urban/industrial look since it is going to be in my apartment I would like it to look good too. I've gone to great measure to get cool decorative boxes next each of my tanks to hide all air pumps powers trips etc...

    Once I get it all set up I'll post of a video of my water filled apartment and giveu guys a tour


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    Last edited: Jan 27, 2016
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  7. Aquayne

    Aquayne Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2016
    Location:
    Morganton, NC
    I once set up an angelfish hatchery in a hospital I worked at . It was a pilot for a sheltered workshop for mentally ill patience. One day I accidentally dumped over a 5 gallon bucket of water in the bathroom. The water went down a floor drain and I thought it was no big deal. The drain leaked all 5 gallons down on top of medical records. My project didn't lasdt long after that. You can never be too careful.
     
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  8. CaliGold

    CaliGold Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2015
    Location:
    South Carolina
    That seems like a serious flaw in the piping and drain systems of the hospital (where much worse fluids than old fish water could potentially run down the drain)! o_O
     
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  9. Gold Digger

    Gold Digger Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2014
    Location:
    United States
    Stock tank ponds are so much fun! I recommend a large DIY overhead sump filter very cheap, efficient, and easy to find the parts.
     
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  10. Aquayne

    Aquayne Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2016
    Location:
    Morganton, NC
    The drain was in a bathroom too! They still got mad at me. Go figga'.
     
  11. Scifisarah

    Scifisarah Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2016
    Location:
    Michigan
    Should have gotten mad at their plumber, not you. That is so silly.
     
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  12. Joshua's golds

    Joshua's golds Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2015
    Location:
    St Petersburg, florida
    So my stock tank comes tomorrow. I am using concrete block to give it a 8" lift

    should I place the holes facing up[​IMG]

    Or holes facing the side view [​IMG]

    For best support of 100 gal stock tank


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  13. Lou

    Lou Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2015
    Location:
    Western Michigan
    Holes up is the strongest but for your "little" stock, it does not make any difference. The blocks can support so much weight and the water in a stock tank is negligible for the blocks.

    Laying the block sideways (holes sideways) does provide some storage spaces.
     
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  14. Fishheadz

    Fishheadz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2014
    Location:
    Moffat, CO.
    When a mason lays cinder blocks, the holes are always vertical, this gives the most structural strength.
     
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  15. Joshua's golds

    Joshua's golds Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2015
    Location:
    St Petersburg, florida
    I was planning on using 6 the stock tank is only 2'x4' , I think that will be enough support
     
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  16. Scifisarah

    Scifisarah Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2016
    Location:
    Michigan
    I am jealous - I wish I was in Florida and could keep them in stock tanks year round outside. I don't even have a drain in my basement, so I'd have to carry buckets up the stairs for water changes if I kept them down there.
     
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  17. Lou

    Lou Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2015
    Location:
    Western Michigan
    Joshua: The following three types of blocks (stretcher, corner, or cap) are usually the same price. My local Menards sell them for $0.96 and Lowes for $1.09, each.

    If you want to raise 8", you get the corner block. It looks smoother and nicer than the stretcher block. You are not mortaring them together so there is no need for the stretcher.

    I think you can do it with only a 4" raise. So you can get the cap block (8x4x16). This is a solid block so you can use it in any orientation.

    My 110-gal tubs are only raised by 1.5" (styrofoam insulation) and I have no problem siphoning, although I do need to dump the bucket a bit more often (not to get it too full).

    [​IMG]
     
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  18. Joshua's golds

    Joshua's golds Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2015
    Location:
    St Petersburg, florida
    I'm becoming so lazy I wish Amazon prime would ship me blocks....
     
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  19. Scifisarah

    Scifisarah Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2016
    Location:
    Michigan
    Hah, they'd be $20 each, but they'd have free shipping!
     
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  20. Joshua's golds

    Joshua's golds Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2015
    Location:
    St Petersburg, florida

    That's so true !!! I'm going to try to swing by lowes or home depot on my home from work today...
     

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