Welcome to aurora.com! Log in or Sign up to interact with the aurora community.

What kind of filter for rubbermaid 300 gal stock tank?

Discussion in 'Goldfish in the Pond' started by Firethorn, Aug 25, 2015.

  1. Firethorn

    Firethorn Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2015
    Location:
    Santa Clara California
    Hi guys,
    I've just purchased a 300 gallon rubbermaid stock tank to put my goldfish fry in. I've put powdered granite and greensand in the bottom and planted anacharis. Should I put a filter on this or will the surface area of the plants and sand be enough? If so what kind? The local fish store has recommended a pondmaster but 230 dollars seems prohibitively expensive.
     
  2. small_ranchu

    small_ranchu Admin Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2008
    Location:
    Bergen, New Jersey
  3. small_ranchu

    small_ranchu Admin Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2008
    Location:
    Bergen, New Jersey
  4. Fishheadz

    Fishheadz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2014
    Location:
    Moffat, CO.
    On my 300(ish) gallon outdoor pond, I have an Aquascape Aquasurge 2000 Pump *2,500GPH* ($350), and that pumps up into an Aquascape Micro Biofalls ($300) I bought a mesh laundry bag at wally-world for like $5, and I filled it with my own home made bio media, (1" x 3' strips of my liner material). The top is supposed to utilize matala filter mats, but the plants I've got growing in the top of the biofalls, roots have overtaken the matala filter mats. No way for me to replace the matala filter mats, without killing a $50 grass plant.

    So $230 is not really that much at all, if you are actually looking at a filter that is going to give you the flow you need. Keep in mind you'll want atleast 6x turnover per hour (for adult fish).
    *2,500 GPH / 300G =8.33 turnover per hour. 2,000GPH / 300G =6.66 turnover per hour. I feel you should be looking at a pump that will give you at least 2,000GPH. You can use a ball valve to reduce flow until your fry get large enough that you can run it wide open.
     
  5. Firethorn

    Firethorn Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2015
    Location:
    Santa Clara California
    Really? I've always had the impression that sponge filters were wimpy. Since I'm dealing with bunch of fry I put a sponge on the end of the intake of some kind of canister. I was goiing to use a fluval fx6 with a sponge

    over the intake. Unfortunately, Fluval FX6's arn't made for outside in the with all the elements. The plastic would get all powdery and make it all britle
     
  6. small_ranchu

    small_ranchu Admin Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2008
    Location:
    Bergen, New Jersey
    Sponge filter is the only filter that widely use among hobbyist breeders around the world. Most of the professional breeders (non-commercial) do not use filter at all.

    In US, a lot of fish keepers including myself don't use any filter at all. We just use air stone with a good air pump.
     
    Amy S likes this.
  7. Firethorn

    Firethorn Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2015
    Location:
    Santa Clara California
    Do you have any pictures? The pictures on the internet are kind of ambiguous.
     
  8. small_ranchu

    small_ranchu Admin Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2008
    Location:
    Bergen, New Jersey
    Check it out..

     
  9. small_ranchu

    small_ranchu Admin Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2008
    Location:
    Bergen, New Jersey
  10. Firethorn

    Firethorn Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2015
    Location:
    Santa Clara California
    So what exactly does the conversion of ammonia? Just the surface of the plants and substrate and walls?
     
  11. small_ranchu

    small_ranchu Admin Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2008
    Location:
    Bergen, New Jersey
    Nothing.. perhaps wall algae.. Ammonia conversion is not important if you go with this method. Instead using 100% water change every 3 or 4 days.
     
  12. Firethorn

    Firethorn Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2015
    Location:
    Santa Clara California
    Well were in the middle of a drought. I cant empty the entire volume every three or four days.
     
  13. small_ranchu

    small_ranchu Admin Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2008
    Location:
    Bergen, New Jersey
    Sorry to hear that..
     
  14. Firethorn

    Firethorn Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2015
    Location:
    Santa Clara California
    Maybe I could hook a cistern to my drip system and water everything in the yard with used fish water. I have to figure out how high it needs to be to generate the minimum pressure required from the emitter heads. Good grief I hate math:p
     
  15. small_ranchu

    small_ranchu Admin Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2008
    Location:
    Bergen, New Jersey
    Actually I did the same thing. Growth rate is very good with fish water. I just use water can so I can't help with the height. :)
     
  16. Fishheadz

    Fishheadz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2014
    Location:
    Moffat, CO.
    I'll be honest, I don't do water changes on my outdoor setup. I do perform a 100% WC with "muck" removal 2x a year,
    late fall (no later than Halloween), and in early spring (no later than Easter).
    However, due to evaporation, about every 4th day I add water (Summertime , Not sure on gallons, maybe 75g, about 4" of depth, I figure about 1" per day evaporation rate).
    Though, I do have a lot of plants in the biofalls, and in the pond. Half of the ponds surface area is floating plants, and there are some submerged.
    I've also got lots of aeration from the (2' tall x 18" wide) waterfall.
    No substrate, other than what falls in by mother nature, and collects at the bottom.
    I know ya'll are thinking, wow no water changes, really? Ya, Really! My parameters are always within a reasonable range, though I do get occasional pH fluctuation, particularly after a rain, it's not drastic, and it stays within an acceptable range 7 - 8.

    A Fluval FX5/6 might be able to be used outdoors, if you built a small enclosure for it, and had it sitting on a few pavers. Certainly would want to use a GFCI outlet/receptacle.
    (This could likely be done relatively cheaply; half sheet of plywood($10?), couple of 1"x2"($4?), handful of screws or nails($2), scrap roll/flat roofing material(? free maybe, ask around construction sites, you might get lucky), 1 can spray paint($4) Grand TTL $20 ) could be cut out, and assembled in an afternoon. (you can have them cut it for you, if you know the dimensions you need, they'll cut every piece, free *Hm. Depot/ Lowes).

    My roommate and I are planning on doing something similar, only for rainwater catchment. the area where the water is to be used is the highest point of the yard. the area where we are going to store our 55g barrels(connected in series), is about 3' lower than the highest point of the watering area. So we're thinking about making the barrel rack at about 6'-7' tall. this should produce 3'-4' of head pressure at the highest point of use. Also, keep in mind, a smaller diameter hose/tubing will produce more pressure than a larger diameter hose/tubing.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2015
  17. small_ranchu

    small_ranchu Admin Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2008
    Location:
    Bergen, New Jersey
    Our goal is different I guess. My goal is to have as many quality babies as possible and making good quality fish. For relaxation, your method is the best.
     
  18. Fishheadz

    Fishheadz Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2014
    Location:
    Moffat, CO.
    Absolutely, different goals, I'm not trying to breed, I'm just trying to enjoy a daily morning cup of coffee in complete serenity.
    Though I have the utmost respect for those who do choose to breed, and in fact I've been looking at your setup, and have been considering doing something similar (only in a solar greenhouse aquaponic application)
     
    small_ranchu likes this.
  19. Firethorn

    Firethorn Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2015
    Location:
    Santa Clara California
    Sure I'll get one tomorrow. It's a lot bigger and rounder than I imagined when I bought it. I can fit two whole different gunnera plants into it plus lotus plants and others growing on the bottom. The anacharis isn't happy living in 6" of water but my parents are having one of their controlling moments and it must run it's course before I finish filling the darn thing. Good thing fry like 6" and under. I've been shopping for more crushed granite, decomposed glacial rock and green sand. I'm really clueless as to what is going to be good for my plants and fish. I'll need your input. Ups - gatos on keyboard - gotta to go
     
  20. Lou

    Lou Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2015
    Location:
    Western Michigan
    Sponge filters or other air powered DIY filters are over looked. Air lifts can move a lot of water.

    I have two 300-gallon stock tanks outside. Since I have ducks, I cannot keep the water lilies in the pond (ducks eat them). So in the spring, I move the liies into these 300-gallon stock tanks with about 9 - 12 adult goldfish (they go to the pond or basement in the winter). What I use is a combination of large sponge filters and filters made using 3-gallon buckets. If you can put more than 10 liters per minute of air into the filters in a 300-gallon stock tank, they can handle a lot of fish load.

    Just the other day, I was testing the airlift capacity of 1" PVC tube. With a 15" long tube (submergence) and 3.5 liters per minute of air injected in a single large bubble airline, the tube can move/lift about 200 gallons per hour of water right to the surface of water by consuming less than 3.5 watts.
     
    RyukinLuver and small_ranchu like this.

Share This Page